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Sun exposure and skin damage

Anyone can have sun damaged skin, but if you have fair skin, burn easily in the sun, have spent a lot of time outdoors, or have a history of using sunbeds, you are at an increased risk of sun damage. 

Sun bathing and using sunbeds

Some people like having a tan but to keep your skin healthy you should avoid sun bathing and using sunbeds, particularly in the middle of the day.

In 2011 the Sunbeds (Regulation) Act  came into force in England and Wales to prevent the use of sunbeds on commercial business premises by children and young people under the age of 18. 

Find out more from the Irish Cancer Society about the risk of sunbeds and regulate sunbed use

 

Outdoor recreation

If your hobbies mean you spend a lot of time outside, make sure you protect your skin from the sun’s rays.  Plan your activities. Try to stay out of the sun, especially in the middle of the day (11am-3pm) when UV rays are at their strongest, cover up by wearing a hat, long sleeved shirts and long skirts and trousers and use a high factor sunscreen (factor 15 or higher) to protect areas that are difficult to cover so that you can enjoy being outside without damaging your skin.

 

Working outside

If your job means that you spend a lot of time outside, take these same precautions to make sure you protect your skin from the sun’s rays. Try to stay out of the sun, especially in the middle of the day (11am-3pm) when UV rays are at their strongest, cover up  by wearing a hat, long sleeved shirts and long skirts and trousers  and use a high factor sunscreen (factor 15 or higher) to protect areas that are difficult to cover. Some companies have recognised that outdoor workers have an increased risk of sun damage to their skin, and provide advice and free sunscreen to help reduce the risk. Ask your employer if they have any guidance in place to help you work safely in the sun.

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